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Monday, 20 June 2011

Apothecary Cabinet.

This piece of work was a great learning curve for me, i made mistakes but continued with the build after all that's how we learn!
Making the cabinet was reasonably easy filling it with contents was a different matter. First off i started looking into what would have been present in a apothecary cabinet, once i had done this then i could look into dimensions and sizes.The first items i made were the brass draw knobs these were turned down from solid brass rod.

                                                            


The wood used is English walnut,this was taken from a broken writing instrument box that was in pretty bad shape, i took the remains of the carcass to bits and planed all the timber to the required thickness.Once this was done i started on the construction of the main carcass.



This all came together rather quickly,The construction of the scales and pill maker along with the mortar and pestle were all achieved using scrap brass, the mortar and pestle being made from a 7.62mm spent ammunition cartridge and a tiny piece of ivory. The medical chart illustration is a handpainted copy on genuine 17th century vellum, painting is another fond pastime of mine i origonally trained as a signwriter when first leaving school carrying out restoration work on horse drawn carridges.The tiny book is a leather bound   Georgian herbal book of medicinal plants measuring approx 35mm x 22mm and containing 62 pages of  coloured plant illustrations and medicinal uses and is readable with a magnifying glass.
Dimensions of the cabinet are H65mm x 60mmW x 65mmD.


And finally the compleated piece of work. All of the jars contain genuine herbs and creams , the inside of the cabinet is lined with green leather as are the draws.
With each miniature piece i create i like if possible to include as many recycled materials as possible also at least some items with age , in this case the vellum the medical chart was painted on is 17th century and the wood used for the construction dates to around 1900. I have enjoyed creating this piece of work and im sure it wont be the last based on this type of theme.

                                                                     SOLD

2 comments:

  1. Wow, I love it! Congratulations on a fabulous new blog to display your treasures!! Cheers, Jean

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  2. Many thanks Jean,and a warm welcome to my blog.

    ReplyDelete