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Tuesday, 28 April 2015

Looking Back.

This post isnt really miniature related but i thought some of you may like the photos i took and thought id share a few of them with you.
Some of you may know others won't that i served my apprenticeship as a signwriter which i was lucky enough to do at one of the largest breweries in the world at that time, I found it fascinating that such a trade could cover so many varied jobs and tasks not just painting signs by hand but gilding, refurbishing old vehicles and carriages and pinstriping, unfortunately as advancements were made in graphics and such the job became a dying trade the brewery went through vast changes and unfortunately many skilled workers including Coopers and Coppersmiths all lost their jobs. This past weekend i visited what was once one of those workshops where i was lucky enough to work as it now forms part of a museum and has been turned into a very unique restaurant.

 



I couldn't believe how much the place had changed from the last time i was in here, the upper floor level in the second image didn't exist and has since been installed as further seating for the restraunt.

 
 
 
 
Virtually all of the walls were adorned with old hand painted and enamelled signs from every year.
 
 
 
 
 
Along with many different locally made beautiful clocks all of which added to the charm of the place, there were also many paintings and photographs from the turn of the century showing these skilled men at work these i have not uploaded due to © reasons .... This place formed an important part of my artistic creativity not only by learning new things, but more importantly learning them from skilled men who had also been taught by skilled men themselves the brewery was founded in 1777 and had always painted its own livery on its own vehicles from horse drawn drays to modern transportation.  Have a great week everyone. Tony.


 





11 comments:

  1. Fantastic! It's always nice to see old things preserved and displayed. Your post makes me think about all the lost arts out there, the things that used be done by hand but are now mass produced. Thank you for sharing!

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    1. Thank you Brae, i had the same thoughts walking around this building looking at the marvelous work that was done by many generations of skilled workers i hope it stays for many years to come so it can be enjoyed by future generations.

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  2. I like all the images and history. Thank you for sharing it.

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    1. My pleasure Debora, glad you enjoyed the post.

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  3. It makes me sad to think of the skills that are lost. I'm glad the brewery kept a lot of the signs and display them as hommage to times past =0)

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    1. Thanks Carol, it still makes me sad now when i think of what that place used to be like... funny but as i walked around i even imagined the smell that the place had too very fond memories..thanks for your comment :)

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  4. Wow, what a great looking place! I didn't know anything about your training, but it's very interesting. I didn't even know that there was such a trade. (Ignorant me!) Aren't you glad that the place was not torn down, but preserved and turned into something really cool that you can now visit any time that you want? Really good.

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    1. Thanks Iris i remember when i started working there some of the trades id never even heard of i count myself lucky to have not only worked there but witnessed the tradesmen actually carrying out their trades.

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  5. This is fascinating! Thank you for posting. What beautiful signage and the restaurant is amazing, right up my alley. I did a stint once hand lettering trucks, but boring compared to the beauty of these gorgeous signs---

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    1. Thanks Linda i have no doubt you and many others would love the restaurant its the type of place where you just can't stop looking around, and thanks for mentioning that you did a stint hand lettering trucks ;) its rare to come across other people who have also tried their hand at this. Thanks for your comment :)

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  6. what a great idea to show this Tony. And what a nice way to be able to see the fruits of many hours of labour of a kind that have now gone extinct but you were once a part of, a century-old-legacy. It is unbelievable in this day and age that all those signs (and carriages etc) were handpainted.. it's good to be reminded of things like that at times, so thank you.

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