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Sunday, 31 December 2017

Applying the wattle and daub.

After yesterdays post Catherine  http://kilmouskiandme.blogspot.co.uk/ kindly asked if i could post on how i added the wattle and daub to the building. Its a very tedious and time consuming process and starts off like this.
 Firstly i cut very fine strips of Oak these are usually from off cuts which i have no use for anyway the strips are around 0.5mm thick the other main reason i use oak is that it tends to bend quite easily at this thickness without splitting.
 Once i have enough pieces i start to weave the timber together and apply a tiny amount of waterproof wood glue to the overlaps it looks complex but once you have done a few it gets easier and these can be formed to fit uneven shapes too.
Once trimmed up these can then be fitted between the main structural timbers with a tiny amount of glue.
For the Daub i use very fine filler with a small amount of water proof wood glue added to the mixture this tends to help bind it better and also helps it stick to the timber once its gone off i have also found that by adding the glue it stops the filler from shrinking or cracking, notice on the above photo how it has squeezed between the small gaps of timber to help form a secure bond.
Just before the filler goes off i tend to give it a wipe over with a damp cloth this helps smooth it out and also reduces the amount of sanding required. As i have said its a fiddly process but its as realistic to the original process as i can get. which is what i wanted from the onset of this build so a little insight into how i have achieved this step of the construction and hopefully one you all find interesting.
                                                            Happy New Year  Tony.

9 comments:

  1. Tony,
    Thank you very much for posting this. I certainly found it very interesting! I am so impressed that you wanted to build the house as authentically as possible and worked out this method to achieve it. I am sure it was very time consuming but worth all your effort. The results are fantastic. I look forward to your next post. Thanks again.

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    1. My pleasure Catherine, its always been an ambition of mine to construct a building of this type so trying to do it as authentically as possible and overcome small issues and problems has been a fun part and learning curve for me.

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  2. Yes it is very interesting! I love posts showing how things are done, thank you :)

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    1. Thanks Linda, Hopefully more posts to come soon :)

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  3. The wattle and daub is brilliant Tony. I love that you are doing it this way even though you won't be able to see the wattle once finished.
    Happy New Year to you!

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    1. Thank you Josje, i wanted to keep the construction as close to the original as possible even though as you said a lot of it will not be on view, i guess knowing in my head that ive done it this way gives me that little more satisfaction. Happy New Year :)

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  4. Hello Tony,
    I wish you all the best for 2018. Thank you for posting about your technique. It looks phenomenal and so realistic.
    Big hug
    Giac

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    1. Many thanks Giac, My best wishes to you for 2018 too ;)

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  5. Wow, Tony, this is so impressive!!! The making of the tiny wattles ....even from oak is amazing! And thank you for showing all the steps... it is a fantasy of mine to build like this, with "real" methods... but one I am not too likely to get to! (Have to finish a few projects first!) Your attention to detail is so admirable! This house will be a work of art! I Love it already!

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